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EDEX 523 - Introduction to Exceptional Children

SYLLABUS (web-based)


This area contains a syllabus from the last time I taught a special section of EDEX 523 so candidates can look at it before they enroll in the class or have access to the class Blackboard site. Please note that I modify the syllabus each time I teach the course - primarily the Specific Assignments (IV.B) and Evaluation and Grading (VI) sections.

NOT THE LATEST - UPDATE!

For a PDF version of this syllabus, click here. This section was primarily for candidates in the Educational Administration Program (Summer 2006).
For a PDF version of the tentative syllabus for Summer II 2009, click here. This section is for two cohots of candidates in the Educational Administration Program.



EDEX J 523 (Web-Based)
Introduction to Exceptional Children
Syllabus

I - DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION

A. Course number and title: EDEX J 523 - Introduction to Exceptional Children

B. Bulletin description: Overview of the field of education for exceptional children. Basic course for those entering the field of special education.

C. Course credit: 3 hours

D. Prerequisite or co-requisite courses: None

E. Intended Audience: Candidates seeking certification in special education. Candidates seeking a M.Ed. in special education. Education majors interested in learning more about exceptional learners.

NOTE: Alternative Accessibility to Course Materials
Any candidate enrolled in this course with a documented disability should contact the Office of Student Disability Services at 803-777-6742 (TDD) or 803-777-6744 to make arrangements for alternative forms of course materials and other classroom accommodations prior to the first class meeting. For more information about the services offered by Student Disabilities Services, please see their web site at http://www.sa.sc.edu/dss/

F. Instructor:
Susan W Quinn
Office of Instructional Support
274 Wardlaw Building, College of Education
Phone: 803-777-8734 (office) or 803-777-4475 (Instructional Support Welcome Desk)
E-mail: susanq@mailbox.sc.edu

II - COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

A. Goals
• To provide candidates with a basic awareness of current issues in special education, including categorization, labeling, and service delivery models.
• To provide candidates with knowledge of legislation and litigation in special education from a current and historical perspective.
• To provide candidates with knowledge of general educational, cognitive, and social-behavioral characteristics of individuals with disabilities.
• To give candidates an understanding of expectations and opportunities for individuals with disabilities.
• To provide candidates with an understanding of the range of services available for individuals with disabilities throughout the lifespan.

B. Objectives
• Candidates will be able to describe the cognitive, educational, and social-behavioral characteristics of individuals with various types of disabilities.
• Candidates will be able to identify and describe various service delivery models in special education.
• Candidates will be able to identify and discuss general educational accommodations for individuals with disabilities.
• Candidates will be able to discuss the major issues that currently face the field of special education.
• Candidates will be able to identify major laws and court cases related to special education and discuss their affects on instructional practices.
• Candidates will be able to discuss the opportunities and services available for individuals with disabilities throughout the lifespan, addressing home, school, recreational, and work environments.
• Candidates will complete activities in which they research information related to course topics and/or apply the information in a meaningful way.

III - REQUIRED MATERIALS AND READINGS

Hunt, N. & Marshall, K. (2006). Exceptional Children and Youth. (4th. ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
[ISBN: 0-618-70463-9]

Additional readings will also be assigned by the instructor. Some of these readings may only be available on the Internet, so candidates enrolled in this course must have access to a computer with Internet access on a regular basis.

IV – ACADEMIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND CANDIDATE PERFORMANCES

A. Academic Responsibility
The Rule of Academic Responsibility (Student Affairs Policy STAF 6.25 ) states that “it is the responsibility of every student at the University of South Carolina Columbia to adhere steadfastly to truthfulness and to avoid dishonesty, fraud, or deceit of any type in connection with any academic program. Any student who violates this rule or who knowingly assists another to violate this rule shall be subject to discipline.” The entire policy on Academic Responsibility can be found on the Student Judicial Programs page at http://www.sa.sc.edu/carolinacommunity/judicial.htm

Violations include, but are not limited to, the following: the use of multimedia elements without appropriate permissions and citations; the use of information without appropriate citation; and the use of work done by others and submitted as your own.

If the instructor reasonably believes that a violation of the Rule has occurred, he or she will share the evidence with the Program and Department Chairs, Academic Deans, and others as appropriate. A violation of the Rule may result in a failing grade for the project/assignment and/or a failing grade for the course in addition to the sanctions discussed in the Rule.

Please note the following statement in the Rule: “Whenever a student is uncertain as to whether conduct would violate this Rule, it is the responsibility of the student to seek clarification from the appropriate faculty member or instructor prior to engaging in such conduct.”

B. Specific Assignments
Examples of the activities in which candidates will be expected to participate include the following:

1. Introduction Assignments: All candidates will complete multiple online activities in which they use the various technologies required in the course, such as sending an e-mail message with an attachment, completing an online survey, and using the Discussion Board, Digital Drop Box, and Assignment features within the class Blackboard site. Together, these activities will introduce the instructor to each candidate and confirm that each candidate can use the technologies required in the course.

2. Activities in Modules: All candidates will complete all the activities within each of the course modules. These activities may include, but are not limited to the following: watch a short movie that introduces the module; complete a survey of previous knowledge about the topic; read the textbook and/or online articles; watch the presentations/lectures; watch (and interact with, when appropriate) demonstrations of resources, teaching tools, assistive technology, and other appropriate materials; complete an online quiz for the module; reply to a discussion prompt in the Discussion Board area of the class web site; complete a reflection activity, which is often a short case study related to the module; and complete a follow-up survey.

3. Research Projects
3a.Condition Paper – All candidates will research one (1) health impairment, disease, or other condition, write a short paper summarizing specific aspects of the condition, and provide a list of resources to help the reader learn more about the condition. A list of possible conditions, detailed instructions, and specific evaluation criteria will be provided. These projects will be posted to the class web site for all candidates enrolled in the course to access.

3b. Resource List – Each candidate will develop a list of resources (magazine articles, books, web sites, etc) for parents and/or educators and organize these resources into subcategories that will be useful to the candidate and others. Examples of subcategories include legal issues, support groups for parents and siblings of a child with a disability, recreational opportunities for individuals with special needs, community-based job training opportunities, etc. The candidate will concentrate on local agencies/organizations first. Additional examples of subcategories, detailed instructions, and specific evaluation criteria will be provided. These projects will be posted to the class web site for all candidates enrolled in the course to access.

3c. Book Reviews – GRADUATE LEVEL CANDIDATES ONLY will identify books that might be useful to them and others as they work with individuals with disabilities or advise others in related areas. They will review the books and report information about each book in the Discussion Board area of the class web site. The reviews will be organized by topic. Broad topics may include Professional Resources (which may include reference books about legal issues, inclusion, etc) and Children’s Literature (which may include books that are appropriate for different age groups.) Projects will be posted to the class web site for all candidates enrolled in the course to access.

4. Surveys
4a. Midterm Update Survey: All candidates will complete this short online activity designed to help the instructor improve instruction and to provide an opportunity to assist any candidates who may be struggling at this point in the semester.

4b. Class Evaluation Surveys: All candidates will complete two online surveys. One is provided by the College of Education to evaluate the course and instructor; the other is from the instructor and is designed to provide an opportunity to make suggestions for ways to improve the course in the future.

5. Class Participation: All candidates will communicate with the instructor, and with their classmates when necessary, through the class web site, e-mail and other appropriate means. Points will be deducted for any activity or assignment in which the candidate does not participate or for any work the candidate does not submit on time. Points may be deducted for failure to respond to a group e-mail or special discussion prompt or failing to sign up for a project. If an assignment can be submitted after the due date/time, points may also be deducted for any assignment for which a late penalty is not assessed as part of the evaluation criteria and scoring rubric.


V - ADMINISTRATIVE COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The Graduate Bulletin* states: “All courses offered through telecommunications meet the same University standards of prerequisites, sequence, etc., that are required in residence work and are subject to the same academic regulations.” (Candidates enrolled at the undergraduate level should refer to the area of the Undergraduate Bulletin* titled “Correspondence Courses.”)

Candidates are responsible for all assigned work and are responsible for any announced changes/additions/deletions to the syllabus and schedule. It is the responsibility of each candidate to check the class web site and their e-mail regularly during the course for changes and other announcements. It is each candidate’s responsibility to confirm that the e-mail address in the Blackboard system is the e-mail address he or she checks regularly.

Assignments should be submitted before the posted due dates/times. Work submitted after the due date/time may not be scored, regardless of the excuse. All assignments are required. Failure to submit any assignment may result in a grade of F.

A grade of “Incomplete” may be assigned at the discretion of the instructor. The guidelines from the Graduate Bulletin* will be followed. Please be aware that a grade of “I” can be given when certain conditions exist, such as “an unanticipated work-related responsibility, family hardship, illness, accident, or verified disability. The student [candidate] should notify the instructor without delay that one of these conditions exists or has arisen. In any case, notification must be given before the end of the term.” Refer to the appropriate bulletin for additional information.


  • The student bulletins are available online at the following URLs:
Graduate Bulletin: http://www.sc.edu/bulletin/grad/GGradschool.html
Undergraduate Bulletin: http://www.sc.edu/bulletin/ugrad/acadregs.html

VI - EVALUATION AND GRADING

Points will be awarded for the following assignments up to the number listed below. Detailed instructions and specific evaluation criteria (scoring guides and/or rubrics) will be provided for each assignment.

GRADUATE LEVEL
Total possible points = 440
1. Introduction Assignments = 20 points
2. Activities in Modules = 350 points
3. Research Projects = 35 points
4. Surveys = 10 points
5. Class Participation = 25 points

Grading Scale (Graduate Level):
A = 396 - 440 points
B+ = 374 - 395 points
B = 352 - 373 points
C+ = 330 - 351 points
C = 308 - 329 points
D+ = 286 - 307 points
D = 264 - 285 points
F = 263 points and below

UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL
Total possible points = 430
1. Introduction Assignments = 20 points
2. Activities in Modules = 350 points
3. Research Projects = 25 points
4. Surveys = 10 points
5. Class Participation = 25 points

Grading Scale (Undergraduate Level):
A = 387 - 430 points
B+ = 366 - 386 points
B = 344 - 365 points
C+ = 323 - 343 points
C = 301 - 322 points
D+ = 280 - 300 points
D = 258 - 279 points
F = 257 points and below

VII - MAJOR TOPICS OF THE COURSE

Topics may include the following:

Overview of the Field of Special Education
Legislation and Other Legal Issues
Referral Process
Individual Plans
Risk Factors
Early Identification and Intervention
Working with Families
Service Delivery Models
Inclusion
Assistive Technology
Adults with Special Needs
Specific Exceptionalities
- Mental Retardation
- Autism Spectrum Disorder
- Learning Disabilities
- Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
- Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
- Communication Disorders
- Hearing Impairments
- Visual Impairments
- Physical Disabilities and Health Impairments
- Gifted and Talented

VIII. MODES OF INSTRUCTION

All of the course materials, including the lectures and demonstrations, will be available on a class web site within the USC Blackboard environment. All the work will be done independently by the candidate unless otherwise noted. Candidates enrolled in this course must have access to a computer with Internet access and an e-mail account on a regular basis. All work will be submitted electronically.

Thinking in terms of a traditional face-to-face course, approximately 38 hours (2280 minutes) will be spent ‘in class’ working with the materials in the course modules. This does not include ‘homework time’, which includes completing the Introduction Assignments, small Research Projects, and Surveys. Additionally, the candidate is expected to spend ‘homework time’ reading the textbook and other assigned readings as well as completing the short quiz and surveys within the course modules.

IX. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Boyle, J. R. & Danforth, S. (2001). Cases in special education. (2nd. ed.) Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Frieman, B. B. (2001). What teachers need to know about children at risk. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Harrington, R. G. & Holub, T. (Eds.). (2006). Taking sides: Clashing views on controversial issues in classroom management. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Salvia, J. & Ysseldyke, J. E. with Bolt, S. (2007). Assessment in special and inclusive education. (10th. ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Schwartz, S. E. & Conley, C. A. (2002). Diverse learners in the classroom. (2nd. ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Wood, J. W. (2002). Adapting instruction to accommodate students in inclusive settings. (4th. ed.) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.

Ysseldyke, J. E., Algozzine, B., & Thurlow, M. L. (2000). Critical issues in special education. (3rd. ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Additional resources will be available on the class web site.

X. Schedule

A separate Schedule for the current semester is available on the class web site.
Candidates are responsible for any announced changes/additions/deletions to the schedule.


Additional Notes About This Web-Based Course

Class Web Site
The University of South Carolina offers uses the course management program Blackboard for online courses and course support. Candidates enrolled in this course must have access to a computer with Internet access on a regular basis. All public libraries in South Carolina should have computers with Internet access.

To access the class web site, point your browser to http://blackboard.sc.edu. After successfully logging in, you will see your classes listed. Click on INTRO TO EXCEPT CHILDREN. Instructions for using Blackboard can be found in the “Blackboard Tips” handout available online through USC Computer Services at http://www.sc.edu/ars/handouts/bb.html You will need your USC Network Username and password to use the class web site. Instructions for finding these can be found in the area called, “Blackboard Username Lookup/Password Set” on the Blackboard Tips handout.

University Services
EDEX J 523 is a web-based course offered through University Instructional Services (UIS), which was formerly known as Distance Education and Instructional Support (DEIS). Information about distance education courses, obtaining materials, etc can be found on the UIS web site at http://www.sc.edu/deis/ss/index.html#semester_based

Technical questions about connecting to the University and technical problems with Blackboard can be answered by calling University Technology Services (UTS) at 803-777-1800. This phone is answered from 8:00-5:00 weekdays. Recorded messages about known network outages and scheduled maintenance events are given 24/7.

More information about the software and other technologies you need for this course will be provided on the class web site and reviewed in the online overview of the course.

Communicating with the Instructor in a Distance Education Course
Much of the communication between the instructor and a candidate enrolled in a distance education course takes place through e-mail. Because the instructor will be getting a large number of e-mails each day and will not have the opportunity to learn each candidate’s e-mail address, it is important for you to identify yourself to the instructor in each message you send. Please use your name as it appears in the University system, either by starting your correspondence with, “This is FirstName LastName. I am writing to …” or by signing your message with your name as it appears on the roles. If you are leaving a phone message for the instructor, it is important to include your complete name, a phone number (including area code) and times you may be reached at that phone number.

One Final Thought – Technology
Please remember that the appropriate technology for the assignment you are working on (Internet access, Blackboard, your e-mail account, etc.) may not always be available when you want it, so do not wait until the last minute to submit an assignment.

Welcome to EDEX J 523!
SQ